MENU
Anatomy
Anesthesiology
Biochemistry
Biomedical Informatics
Biophysics
Cell Biology
Clinical Cases
Dentistry
Dermatovenerology
Emergency Medicine
Family Medicine
Forensic Medicine
Gynecology and Obstetrics
Histology and Embryology
History of Medicine
Human Genetics
Hygiene
Infectious Diseases
Internal Medicine
Medical Deontology and Philosophy
Medical Psychology
Microbiology and Immunology
Neurology
Occupational Medicine
Oncology
Ophthalmology
Orthopaedics
Otorhinolaryngology
Pathology
Pathophysiology
Pediatrics
Pharmacology and Experimental Toxicology
Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
Physiology
Psychiatry
Radiology
Social Medicine
Surgery
Toxicology
Research papers
Clinical research paper
Preclinical research paper
Sponsored articles
Latest edition » |

Functional Hyperandrogenism

 

This post is also available in: enEnglish slSlovenščina (Slovenian)

Functional hyperandrogenism is a common endocrinological disorder of premenopausal wo­men characterized by hyperandrogenism, hirsutism with or without androgenic alopecia and chronic anovulation. The controversy regarding the pathophysiological mechanism underl­ying the disease still persists. Insulin resistance and hyperinsulinism are now well recognized features of obese women with functional hyperandrogenism and accepted pathogenetic fac­tor of disorder in obese patients. Insulin enhances lutheotropic hormone secretion and together with it promotes synthesis of androgens in ovaries. Insulin affects the degree of free andro­gens by lowering serum concentrations of sex-hormone binding globuline. It stimulates synthesis of androgens in adrenal glands and ovaries by enhancing activity of citocrom P450c17alpha.

Non-obese women with functional hyperandrogenism have less expressed insulin resi­stance and higher serum growth hormone concentrations than obese androgenized women as well as weight matched controls. Higher growth hormone directly and indirectly (through insulin-like growth factor-I) influence ovarian cells and stimulates androgen synthesis. The­re is possible link between both known aethiopathogenetic factors of functional hyperandrogenism: growth hormone induces insulin resistance and hyperinsulinaemia, which in turn sensitate peripheral tissues for growth hormone.

© 2020 Društvo Medicinski razgledi | Na vrh strani / To top ↑