MENU
Anatomy
Anesthesiology
Biochemistry
Biomedical Informatics
Biophysics
Cell Biology
Clinical Cases
Dentistry
Dermatovenerology
Emergency Medicine
Family Medicine
Forensic Medicine
Gynecology and Obstetrics
Histology and Embryology
History of Medicine
Human Genetics
Hygiene
Infectious Diseases
Internal Medicine
Medical Deontology and Philosophy
Medical Psychology
Microbiology and Immunology
Neurology
Occupational Medicine
Oncology
Ophthalmology
Orthopaedics
Otorhinolaryngology
Pathology
Pathophysiology
Pediatrics
Pharmacology and Experimental Toxicology
Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
Physiology
Psychiatry
Radiology
Social Medicine
Surgery
Toxicology
Research papers
Clinical research paper
Preclinical research paper
Sponsored articles
Archive » 2010 » 4 » | Archive » Medical field » Fields » Internal Medicine » Archive » Medical field » Fields » Pathophysiology » Archive » Medical field » Fields » Pediatrics » Archive » Medical field » Fields » Physiology »

Irritable Bowel Syndrome

 
Abstract:

This post is also available in: enEnglish slSlovenščina (Slovenian)

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional bowel disorder characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort with altered frequency of defecation and stool consistency. Some people with IBS also experience urgency for bowel movements, feeling of incomplete stool evacu­ation, straining and cramping during defecation, presence of mucus in stool, abdominal dis­tention and flatulence. IBS is believed to be the consequence of several factors: altered bowel motility and sensitivity (visceral hypersensitivity), altered brain-gut axis function, low-grade mucosal inflammation, disturbed balance of intestinal microbiota, chemical irritation, action of psychogenic factors and (at least in some cases) genetic predisposition. When there are no alarm signs, the diagnosis of IBS can be made on the basis of clinical presentation alone. When alarm signs, such as rectal bleeding, fever, high erythrocyte sedimentation rate, weight loss, failure to thrive (children) or positive family history for organic bowel disease (chron­ic inflammatory bowel disease, cancer) are present, accurate diagnostics is necessary. When treating patients with IBS, education and a trustful patient-doctor relationship are necessary, with emphasis on IBS being a benign disorder that only rarely leads to serious consequences. Some patients benefit from excluding nutrients that are known to cause discomfort from their diet. However, most patients do not need a specific diet. Special probiotics having effects val­idated by high-quality clinical trials may be useful in treating patients with IBS. When mental factors play an important part, psychotherapy may also have a role. The use of medications, however, is reserved only for resistant forms of IBS.

Authors:
Orel Rok

Keywords:
irritable bowel syndrome, functional bowel disorder

Cite as:
Med Razgl. 2010; 49: 479–85.

Download PDF >>
© 2021 Društvo Medicinski razgledi | Na vrh strani / To top ↑