MENU
Anatomy
Anesthesiology
Biochemistry
Biomedical Informatics
Biophysics
Cell Biology
Clinical Cases
Dentistry
Dermatovenerology
Emergency Medicine
Family Medicine
Forensic Medicine
Gynecology and Obstetrics
Histology and Embryology
History of Medicine
Human Genetics
Hygiene
Infectious Diseases
Internal Medicine
Medical Deontology and Philosophy
Medical Psychology
Microbiology and Immunology
Neurology
Occupational Medicine
Oncology
Ophthalmology
Orthopaedics
Otorhinolaryngology
Pathology
Pathophysiology
Pediatrics
Pharmacology and Experimental Toxicology
Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
Physiology
Psychiatry
Radiology
Social Medicine
Surgery
Toxicology
Research papers
Clinical research paper
Preclinical research paper
Sponsored articles
Archive » 2004 » 1 » | Archive » Medical field » Fields » Hygiene » Archive » Medical field » Fields » Infectious Diseases »

Hand Hygiene of Healthcare Workers in an Intensive Care Unit

 
Abstract:

This post is also available in: enEnglish slSlovenščina (Slovenian)

Hand hygiene among health care workers (HCW) is the most important, the easiest and the cheapest preventative measure against nosocomial infections. Hand disinfection is more effec­tive, faster and less harmful for the skin than all other hand hygiene techniques. This study evaluated compliance with hand hygiene rules in an intensive care unit (ICU) where alco­holic hand disinfection is the standard procedure for hands that are not visibly soiled.

Patients and methods. Opportunities for hand hygiene were defined according to CDC guidelines. HCW in 6 patient rooms was observed during routine care and clinical rounds over 2 months. One month into the study, additional infection-control measures were imple­mented, encouraging HCW to use alcoholic hand disinfection more consistently. Compliance with hand hygiene guidelines was related to the transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) between patients in the ICU. 531 opportunities for observing hand hygiene were documented. In 75% of the opportunities, HCW performed a hand hygiene procedure: hand disinfection was used in 97% with a mean duration of 7 seconds, whereas hand washing was used in 3% and required a mean of 11 seconds. Compliance was higher after removing gloves (85%), after direct patient contact (89%) and after contact with a patien­t’s bodily fluids (100%) than between care of clean and dirty bodily areas (21%) and before manipulating vascular and urinary catheters (25%) (p<0.05). After implementing additional infection-control measures, compliance increased significantly, from 72% to 82% (p<0.05). This correlated with a decrease in the incidence of MRSA transmission from 11% to 2% (p=0.003) in the same period. During the study, compliance did not significantly differ among age groups, gender or profession. The overall compliance with hand hygiene in HCW was good (75%). Hand disinfection was performed in 97% of cases. An increase in compliance with hand hygiene was achieved as a result of additional motivation of HCW to use hand disinfection; this also correlated with a significant decrease in MRSA transmission in the ICU.

Authors:
Tjaša Grilc, Igor Muzlovič, Matjaž Jereb, Andrej Trampuž

Keywords:
intenzivno zdravljenje enote, roka umivanje, infekcija navzkrižna, dezinficiensi, Staphylococcus aureus

Cite as:
Med Razgl. 2004; 43: 45–53.

Download PDF >>
© 2022 Društvo Medicinski razgledi | Na vrh strani / To top ↑